It is really interesting that culturally, in the arts, we really aren't inventing much that is truly new. I mean, normally, art builds upon what came before, and in doing so creates something truly unique. So back in post-war England, you had American Blues flooding into country percolating into the skiffle craze and eventually coming to fruition in some of the must influential rock bands the world has ever know: The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Who, Cream, Led Zeppelin — all of them built upon those primitive three chords and guitar styles invented in the Mississippi Delta, turned it all up to 11 and created a hard rock juggernaut that conquered the world for the better part of three decades.

Now, it seems that we often find our muse in straight up nostalgia. Jake Bugg isn't taking Dylan's folky sound to some other place, he is just appropriating it wholesale and finding much success in the process because popular music is largely a stagnant pool with no fresh, inspired sound to flush it out. When you hear Bugg's stuff, for a minute you feel you've been pleasantly hit in the face with a cool, invigorating breeze but that is because you are experiencing something purely derived from a time when popular music was brimming with new ideas, endless possibility, and the heady, exhilarating danger of social revolution.

I like what he is doing a lot but I find it fascinating this trend toward turning back and resurrecting old styles in their pure form as we are starved for anything that feels authentic.