Idaho for the marriage equality win

Idaho will be the 18th U.S. state to have legal marriage equality this Friday.

In 2006, Idaho voters changed the Idaho constitution to limit marriage to that between a man and a woman, and to not allow any out-of-state same-sex unions to be recognized.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Candy Dale, in the decision, says: "Idaho's Marriage Laws withhold from them a profound and personal choice, one that most can take for granted. By doing so, Idaho's Marriage Laws deny same-sex couples the economic, practical, emotional, and spiritual benefits of marriage, relegating each couple to a stigmatized, second-class status. Plaintiffs suffer these injuries not because they are unqualified to marry, start a family, or grow old together, but because of who they are and whom they love."

Idaho governor Butch Otter, one of the defendants in the lawsuit, says: "In 2006, the people of Idaho exercised their fundamental right, reaffirming that marriage is the union of a man and a woman. Today's decision, while disappointing, is a small setback in a long-term battle that will end at the U.S. Supreme Court. I am firmly committed to upholding the will of the people and defending our Constitution."

Apparently Idaho's governor thinks that marriage equality won't win at the U.S. Supreme Court, and that state constitutions can discriminate against people if a majority of voters okay it. Go figure.