Artist Cornelia Parker has teamed up with Nobel Prize winning scientist Konstantin Novoselov to create a new work for the reopening of Whitworth Gallery in Manchester. The piece (intended as a reflection on the Gallery's historical collection) will be made of graphene the material Novoselov helped develop and for which he won the Nobel Prize for physics in 2010.

Artist turning Art into Science and back into Art again

The graphene – a one atom thick sheet of carbon arranged into a honeycomb structure – will be created using microscopic samples of graphite taken from items in the gallery's collection including a drawing by William Blake and a letter from physicist Sir Ernest Rutherford. These will then form the basis of an electronic humidity sensor that will form the trigger system for a fireworks display (itself based on Blake's The Anchient of Days).

Artist turning Art into Science and back into Art again

Parker regularly works with the ideas of material transformation, her best-known work being Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View, popularly titled "The Exploding Shed", which will also be in the exhibition as part of a small retrospective of her work.

Artist turning Art into Science and back into Art again

via: BBC , Whitworth Gallery